The ice on Lake Michigan has turned blue. Here’s why.

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The ice on portions of Michigan’s Great Lakes has turned blue, but don’t worry, there’s a perfectly good reason why. 

The phenomenon is common on glaciers, but not so much on large swathes of lake ice. It’s happening where Lake Michigan meets Lake Huron, at a place called the Straits of Mackinac. There, fat slabs and mounds of cracked blue ice have collected near the shorelines.

Local photographer Tori Burley captured the image above. 

The ice, however, is not actually turning blue. The color is a result of the way sunlight is bouncing off this particular ice, explained Ted Scambos, a research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center, in an interview.  Read more…

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